im looking at modules to get a Fat Deep Sub in my Eurorack System

Got recommended getting something like this
https://schneidersladen.de/en/doepfer-a-160-2-clock-divider-ii?number=150066

and then run my oscillator thru it,and then mix the square wave suboctave with my main osc.

will that work?

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should do - as long as it is an analog clock divider, which I think the doepfer is

I often use a dreadbox div to do the same thing - although usually I use a square wave from the oscillator too - og tides high/low outputs as the input to the divider

/2 = - 1 octave
/4 = - 2 octaves

Utility modules are the inexpensive, dull polish that makes the expensive, shiny modules actually shine!!!


I've just tried on my Doepfer A-160-2 and it works. Great tip by way, I hadn't thought of that.
Plus having the option to change between triggers and gates you get two different timbres to choose from.


I've just tried on my Doepfer A-160-2 and it works. Great tip by way, I hadn't thought of that.
Plus having the option to change between triggers and gates you get two different timbres to choose from.
-- Mazz

awesome then i think its safe for me to put in a order for the A-160-2:)

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Another possibility would be the Tiptop Fold Processor...this gives you a dual-input waveshaper (with CV control) AND an audio suboctave divider. Not only can this do the suboctave division, but you also have the ability to do a lot of timbral alterations to inputted signals.


Question: why not just tune it lower vs. have derived suboctaves (as discussed above)?

BTW from producerdojo.com I learned an interesting technique which is basically distorted sine sub bass. Step 1: have a pure sine tuned to your sub frequency, which gives you a very controlled and very powerful fundamental. Step 2: mult that to another pathway, distort the hell out of it to taste, highpass filter it so you can add it on top of your pure sub without problems, and do other filtering plus leveling for control to taste. The results are i) you get a powerful controled sub ii) you get a fizzy or nasty top you can mix in to taste iii) you can CV or otherwise change the top for lots of expression / variety iv) everything tracks pitch, gliss and dives perfectly. I've done this in VSTs but not yet my eurorack setup, should work fine in eurorack.

If the clock divider technique (from above) works well, I'll need to add that to my box of tricks and try it in eurorack soon!


BTW from producerdojo.com I learned an interesting technique which is basically distorted sine sub bass. Step 1: have a pure sine tuned to your sub frequency, which gives you a very controlled and very powerful fundamental. Step 2: mult that to another pathway, distort the hell out of it to taste, highpass filter it so you can add it on top of your pure sub without problems, and do other filtering plus leveling for control to taste. The results are i) you get a powerful controled sub ii) you get a fizzy or nasty top you can mix in to taste iii) you can CV or otherwise change the top for lots of expression / variety iv) everything tracks pitch, gliss and dives perfectly. I've done this in VSTs but not yet my eurorack setup, should work fine in eurorack.
-- nickgreenberg

That technique may stem from the way bass is usually recorded. Duplicate tracks, one low-passed stays clean, the other hi-passed gets distortion.
Sounds like a very interesting idea to apply that to the Eurorack mindset. I'm definitely going to try it.


I hadn’t thought about it from a recording perspective.

The demonstration scenario I saw for this technique is literally all in a DAW (Live) with a VST sine as the source and sub, and a copy of that source/sub then routed to literally anything one might imagine usable as a distortion / waveshaper. They illustrate it with IZotope Trash2 which is certainly a distortion unit, but also with compressors super overdriven to become nonlinear and distorting. Actually that’s kind of the magic of this technique, is that with enough input gain into the subsequent processor you can get all kinds of grit and nonlinearity from processors you would never really expect to use as distortion. Then on the back end you use filtering and level to get just as much sizzle bright or harsh as you want. And all of it it very dynamic/playable and all of it tracks the source pitch perfectly. It’s an exciting and bottomless technique IMO, one I need to keep remembering and practicing.

Glad it’s of interest to you. Yes check it out!! Cheers, NG


i have used theabove technique for many years in the DAW.

have ordered the A-160-2

next week i will get a D.o.m.i.x.x mixer module from Bloodcells audio
and i finally can start to use my Eurorack system

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Of course, it's worth noting that my finest bass patch of all time (it DAMAGES things!) was programmed on my Casio CZ-101. It's not always necessary to go with modular, after all...