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Correct. Overdriving a simple waveform such as a sine or triangle will result in distortion, but in a simple waveform this actually translates into adding harmonics...which is the same thing a waveshaper circuit is specifically designed to do via wavefolding, rectification, clipping, or basic ol' nonlinear distortion. With a more complex sound like drums, where there's not a specific pitch as such, this can result in a heavier, more 'crunchy' sound. Quite a few producers that I knew back in the days of the rave scene would use input preamp overload on their TR-909 kick signal to push that sound into the range of the fuzzy, semi-pitched BOOM that would make the dancefloor go crazy. In fact, if you listen to a lot of Aphex Twin's earlier work up to around the time he released "On", he employs a host of "bad/wrong" production and engineering techniques that wind up making a "right" in that it defined that crazed, ultra-hard acid sound he championed, most notably on his "Dice Man" and "JOYREX" releases.
-- Lugia

You are the wikipedia of sound great Ligia you open my mind!

-- Lucapiombo92

Lugia*


Correct. Overdriving a simple waveform such as a sine or triangle will result in distortion, but in a simple waveform this actually translates into adding harmonics...which is the same thing a waveshaper circuit is specifically designed to do via wavefolding, rectification, clipping, or basic ol' nonlinear distortion. With a more complex sound like drums, where there's not a specific pitch as such, this can result in a heavier, more 'crunchy' sound. Quite a few producers that I knew back in the days of the rave scene would use input preamp overload on their TR-909 kick signal to push that sound into the range of the fuzzy, semi-pitched BOOM that would make the dancefloor go crazy. In fact, if you listen to a lot of Aphex Twin's earlier work up to around the time he released "On", he employs a host of "bad/wrong" production and engineering techniques that wind up making a "right" in that it defined that crazed, ultra-hard acid sound he championed, most notably on his "Dice Man" and "JOYREX" releases.
-- Lugia

You are the wikipedia of sound great Ligia you open my mind!


BTW, don't forget that in some cases, distortion can work in your favor. One of the reasons why the Moog CP3 mixer circuit is so highly-praised is because of what it does 'wrong', not for what it should do. If you were to treat it like a normal mixer...well, it would sort of suck at that, because the CP3 has a lot of interesting nonlinearities that just mess up routine audio, but when applied to the purer waveforms within a synthesizer, they act as something of a waveshaping component at high levels. And that 'bad engineering' is actually key to the Moog modular (and now the Grandmother, which supposedly uses a new variation on that original Moog circuit) sound just as much as their famous transistor-ladder VCF designs. If you applied the same principle to drum sounds, they'd likely get a bit more crunchy and hit a tad harder and edgier from the enharmonic distortion.

So 'totally clean' sometimes isn't the way to go. Best suggestion is to research audio clips or go to a dealership if one is within driving distance and see if 'pristine' or 'crunchy' (and for that matter, what kind of 'crunchy') is what works for you.
-- Lugia

Thanks for the explanation Lugia then in a few words the distortion can actually improve a sound in the analog?


I'm less than six months ahead of you. But have about 25 years in audio engineering. :)
-- Ronin1973

Experience you have accumulated I'd say ;)


I checked the website, there's no documentation that I can find.
http://www.bubblesound-instruments.com/MIX6.html

You may want to contact the manufacturer. There are mixers that are intentionally made with low headroom so that distortion can be used as an effect. I don't think this one does. I'd ask the manufacturer how many volts it can take at unity gain before distortion. In most mixers, you can intentionally overdrive the sound by starting with an already loud signal and making it louder.

I don't think you'd have an issue unless your drums are already slamming the inputs.
-- Ronin1973

Thanks Ronin for the tip I'm new in this fantastic modular world


I wanted to ask something about this interesting 6-channel mixer in 5hp and good price.
Could it be fine for drum modules without distorting the sound? or the sound is mixed with each other?


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